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Miniature Grinding Mill Provides Observation of 'Green' Chemical Reactions. Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new approach for observing mechanochemical reactions — where simple ingredients are ground up to make new chemical compounds and materials that can be used in anything from the pharmaceutical to the metallurgical, cement and mineral industries. The study, published in Nature Communications and led by Cambridge Earth Sciences’ Dr Giulio Lampronti, observed reactions as materials were pulverised inside a miniaturised grinding mill — providing new detail on the structure and formation of crystals. #News #GreenTechnology ...
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Detective Work on the Fuel Cell. Researchers at TU Wien are investigating new materials that can be used to reduce the operation temperature of solid oxide fuel cells. To do so, they apply an innovative method. In order to reduce the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells from currently 800°C to 450°C to 600°C, scientists at TU Wien are researching alternative materials that are suitable to serve as cathodes at this lower temperatures. The research was published in Journal of Materials Chemistry A . #News #Energy #Fuelcells ​​​
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Recycled Factory Heat Benefits Industries and the Environment. Industrial processes account for more than a fourth of Europe’s primary energy consumption and produce a tremendous amount of heat. EU funded research is closing the circle with novel systems that recover waste heat and return it for reuse in industrial process lines. One of the greatest challenges is dealing with the immense variety of exhaust temperatures and constituents, which makes it difficult to use off-the-shelf heat exchangers. The EU-funded ETEKINA project has developed novel tailor-made heat pipe heat exchangers (HPHEs) successfully piloted in the ceramics, steel and aluminium industries. ...
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Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize many of today’s advanced systems and machinery via the manipulation of matter on a near-atomic scale to produce new structures, materials, and devices. A team of researchers, writing in the journal Polymers , have synthesized a hybrid fibre-reinforced polymer specifically for aeronautical structural purposes with the addition of ceramic nanoparticles. Read more here . #News #Polymer #Composites #Aerospace #Aeronautical #CeramicNanoparticles ​​​​​​
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First In-flight, 100% Sustainable Fuels Emissions Study of Passenger Jet Shows Early Promise. Initial findings from a world-first study of the impact of 100% sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) on both engines of a commercial jet have provided promising early results. In-flight emissions tests and associated ground testing on the ECLIF3 programme (involving Airbus, Rolls-Royce, German research centre DLR and SAF producer Neste) began earlier this year and have recently resumed. The interdisciplinary team, which also includes researchers from the National Research Council of Canada and The University of Manchester, plans to publish its results in academic journals ...
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Researchers Develop Artificial Iintelligence to Advance Energy Technologies. Hongliang Xin, an associate professor of chemical engineering in the College of Engineering, Virginia Tech and his collaborators have devised a new artificial intelligence framework that can accelerate discovery of materials for important technologies, such as fuel cells and carbon capture devices. Their new approach called TinNet — short for theory-infused neural network — combines machine-learning algorithms and theories for identifying new catalysts. The research was published in Nature Communications . #News #MachineLearning #AI #ArtificialIntelligence #Energy #Catalysts ...
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3D Laser Nanoprinters Become Compact. The lasers in today's laser printers for paper printouts are tiny. In contrast, 3-D laser printers that print three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures have previously required large and expensive laser systems. Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University are now using a different method instead. The two-stage absorption works with tiny blue laser diodes that are inexpensive. This makes it possible to work with much smaller printers. The researchers report on their work in the journal Nature Photonics . #News #3DPrinting #Nanotechnology #AdditiveManufacturing #Laser ...
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Marienhütte Implements AI Solution in Steel Production. Austrian steelmaker Stahl und Walzwerk Marienhuette Graz has successfully commissioned 'SST Temperature AI' software from Smart Steel Technologies (SST). According to SST, process stability is optimized across all stations, minimising temperature buffers and consequently lowering the EAF tapping temperature. The result, claims SST, is permanent energy and CO2 savings as well as increased process stability. #News #AI #ArtificialIntelligence #Furnace #Decarbonisation #GreenTechnology ​​​​​​​​
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Pathway for ‘Green Ammonia’ Opens in New Study. For decades, scientists have been working hard to find new and more sustainable ways to produce ammonia. Together with the team from DICP, Tejs Vegge and his colleagues from DTU, have introduced a potential game-changer with a new class of complex metal hydride catalysts that had them reach the coveted mild-condition ammonia synthesis. They believe their method could pave the way for new and more sustainable means of ammonia production. Their paper was published in Nature Catalysis . #News #GreenTechnology #Catalyst #Sustainability ​​​​
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Programmable Microbial Ink for 3D Printing of Living Materials. A team of researchers from Harvard University and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, has developed a type of living ink that can be used to print living materials. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications , the group describes how they made their ink and possible uses for it. #News #3DPrinting #Nanotechnology ​​​​
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Turning Textile Sludge into Bricks. Researchers at the State University of the Northern Rio de Janeiro, Brazil have been looking into the feasibility of converting waste sludge from textiles production, such as laundering and dyeing, into a raw material for the ceramic industry in the hope of both reducing the impact of the textile industry and create a sustainable new raw material to make bricks and roof tiles. The research was published in the Journal of Building Engineering . #News #Ceramics #Bricks #Tiles #WasteManagement #Sustainability #Construction ​​​​​​​
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' Super Jelly' can Survive Being Run Over by a Car. Researchers have developed a jelly-like material that can withstand the equivalent of an elephant standing on it, and completely recover to its original shape, even though it’s 80% water. The soft-yet-strong material, developed by a team at the University of Cambridge, looks and feels like a squishy jelly, but acts like an ultra-hard, shatterproof glass when compressed, despite its high water content. The non-water portion of the material is a network of polymers held together by reversible on/off interactions that control the material’s mechanical properties. This is the first time that such significant resistance ...
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SCHOTT Receives Funding to Develop Climate-friendly Glass Production. In the fall of 2020, the specialty glass manufacturer SCHOTT announced its intention to become climate-neutral by 2030. Technology change plays a central role in a 4-part action plan. Now, SCHOTT has been awarded two grants totaling 4.5 million Euros from German Minister of the Environment Svenja Schulze to support the development of climate-friendly glass melting processes. The funding comes from the "Decarbonization in Industry" grant program of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment. #News #Glass #NetZero #Decarbonisation ​​​​
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Grant Awarded to UK Turbine Blade Recycling Project . Funding has been allocated by the UK Government to a £2 million pilot scheme developing the nation’s ‘first wind blade turbine recycling plant’. Convened by a consortium headed by Aker Offshore Wind – and additionally consisting of Composites UK; Nottingham University; SUEZ; GRP Solutions; and Cubis – the 3-year project will commercialise the method of separating the glass-fibre and resin components of turbine blades developed by the University of Strathclyde’s Advanced Composites Group and Lightweight Manufacturing Centre. The obtained glass fibre element is then to be reprocessed, moulded and redistributed ...
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New Technology in Metal Recycling. The application of artificial intelligence and cutting-edge sensor technology promises major efficiency gains in the metal scraping industry. #News #AI #ArtificialIntelligence #WasteManagement #Metals #Recycling #GreenTechnology ​​​​​​​​
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Researchers Develop Ultra-Thin 'Computer on the Bone'. A team of University of Arizona researchers has developed an ultra-thin wireless device that grows to the surface of bone and could someday help physicians monitor bone health and healing over long periods. The devices, called osseosurface electronics, are described in a paper published in Nature Communications . #News #Healthcare #Bone ​​​
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Glass as Stable as Crystal : Homogeneity Leads to Stability. Scientists from The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science used computer simulations to study the aging mechanism that can cause an amorphous glassy material to turn into a crystal. They find that removing tiny irregularities in local densities help prevent the atomic "avalanches" that trigger ordered structure formation. This work may lead to more stable glassy materials, including for pharmaceutical applications. The research was pubished in Physical Review Letters . #News #Glass #Healthcare ​​​
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Enhancing Energy Storage of Ceramics by Modulating Grain Size. Researchers from China have fabricated a ferroelectric ceramic with reduced grain size for improved energy storage capacity as a substitute to lead in dielectric capacitors. The research has been published in Chemical Engineering Journal . #News #AdvancedCeramics #Energy ​​​​
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New Lignin Based Material to Replace Fossil Plastics and Adhesives. Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a resource-efficient method to produce new lignin-based materials that can be thermally reprocessed and used to substitute thermosetting resins and adhesives. The research was published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. #News #GreenTechnology #Adhesives #Plastics #Sustainability ​​​​​
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Improving Plastic Waste Separation with Magnetic Fields. In 2018, 61.8 million metric tons of plastic waste was produced in the European Union with only 9.4 million metric ton recycled. This constitutes a huge amount of plastic waste, which rapidly needs to be addressed. One solution is to turn to magnetic density separation, which can separate plastic materials using magnetic fields, but this technique is not always effective. Rik Dellaert studied flows of plastic particle mixtures in wind tunnels to assess the effect of turbulence on the separation process. He defend his PhD thesis on November 26th at the department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University ...
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